Forums General Topics Brewing Methods and Techniques How/When to add coffee to a porter or stout

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #16089
    nicnzl
    Participant

    Hi,

    I’m looking at making a coffee porter or stout soon.

    When would be the best time to add the cold brewed coffee to the beer brew?

    And how would you add the coffee?

    Any ideas?
    Cheers

    Edit: I’m hoping this is the right sub-forum to post to.

    #16417
    avensgarth
    Participant

    I added cold brewed coffee during bottling.

    It took quite a bit of experimentation to get the right beer to coffee ratio and depended a lot on taste. My ” Double Espresso” is based on WW dry stout with 20% coffee while my favourite “Long Black” is also based on WW dry stout with 5% coffee.

    #16423
    dukenukem
    Participant

    I just made a brew with a Cooper Stout (Coopers mainly as I couldn’t get the Muntons Irish Stout which I think is a great kit.)
    I used the Coopers Stout kit with WW Dry Light Malt.
    I added 1L of Espresso coffee straight from my machine after I had the vat half fill along with the dry malt. Filled to the 22L line, and brewed at 20.5 degree C.
    The final result could be liken to a Kahlua Beer. Most people who tried it, liked it and with 1L of Espresso coffee it was held quite a flavor. If you are worried about it being to much coffee, then try it with 1/2L of coffee. It did settle down a bit after 1 week and it think it will only improve.
    Good Luck

    #16420
    mf8176
    Participant

    Hi,
    Ian suggested I let you know how I put together a coffee stout:
    I used the WW Dry Stout kit (older style with less Dry Malt than in the current kits). I added the coffee when the brewery was half-full with water, after the other ingredients had been added.

    I used freshly roasted, roughly ground beans at the rate of 100 gm coffee per litre of total volume, so 2.3 KG. This was too strong; next time I”ll cut it to 40 gm per litre. I added boiling water to the coffee in a large pot such that the coffee was just submerged after stirring, and let steep for 10 minutes. I filtered this 500 ml at a time through a French Press, and poured into the water in the brewery. The volume of hot water was not so great that it raised the final temperature excessively. The coffee extract was very viscous, and that had me concerned, but it settled out nicely in the end, so no problems. I did not take an initial SG,

    I brewed the mix as per the guide for stout in terms of time and temperature. The final beer was very dark, and very strong in coffee flavour, too strong, so a reduction in coffee concentration is recommended. I thought aside from an overpowering coffee flavour that it was good in clarity, colour (almost black), bitterness, and basically I think this is a good starting point for a coffee beer.

    Good luck all!

    #16421
    santiago aon
    Participant

    I haven’t tried but heard of recipes adding 10 espresso shots for a subtle coffee flavor after fermentation. This is apparently to avoid the aroma being pushed out during the fermentation process.

    My question to those who have experimented with coffee already is: How does the oil in coffee beans affect head retention in the final beer?

    Challenge #2: Would you add a few oak cubes after fermentation for an ‘oak-barreled’ effect?

    Happy brewing.

    #16422
    avensgarth
    Participant
    Santiago Aon wrote:
    I haven’t tried but heard of recipes adding 10 espresso shots for a subtle coffee flavor after fermentation. This is apparently to avoid the aroma being pushed out during the fermentation process.[quote]

    I wouldn’t use espresso as the acid resulting from the hot espresso process can affect the flavours in the beer. Cold press all the way, if you’re adding coffee rather than beans. I’d like to hear how adding beans works.

    Santiago Aon wrote:
    My question to those who have experimented with coffee already is: How does the oil in coffee beans affect head retention in the final beer? [quote]

    Head retention was fine when adding cold pressed coffee when bottling.

    #16419
    joshd
    Participant

    Just quickly.. I have tried this once and the resulting beer definitely had a coffee taste and aroma to it, maybe a little too much, and what I did was pretty simple!

    With a very dark beer like a porter or stout you probably only want or need to do a single clarification, so after cooling the beer and emptying the sediment bottle, try re-filling it with cold black coffee made to the strength you desire, rather than with beer foam or CO2 from the bottle. Or you could half fill it with cold black coffee and top it up with foam or beer maybe.

    This works because when performing the clarification you should have the lever that closes the seal to the sediment bottle all the way up, then once clarification is done the lever is thrown down and the coffee or beer/coffee in the sediment bottle will mix in with the rest of the beer and add the desired flavour.

    Well it worked for me once anyway… maybe I’ll try it again one day soon when I try another dark beer

    Cheers!
    josh

    #16418
    mf8176
    Participant

    I posted an earlier reply to this topic from Singapore using memory. Now that I’ve returned to NZ and can check the brew log, I see I was off by an order of magnitude: the coffee was added at a rate of 10gm (not 100 gm) per litre of final volume, or a total of 230 gm. Everything else was the same in terms of time and such. We will probably try a cold extraction next time: course ground beans with room temp. water left overnight in the ‘fridge, then French Press to filter, add to the initial ingredient mix at the start of fermentation. By the way, we had no trouble with head on the final brew using a hot water extraction, so coffee oils not apparently an issue here. Perhaps doing a cold extraction, we won’t need to reduce the coffee weight to lower the intensity of the coffee flavour. Very much fun experimenting this way. Good luck.

    #16424
    philicious
    Participant

    I added 1L of espresso after adding the dry ingredients. It made for a very pronounced coffee flavour, but was immensely popular. I’d would dial it back to about half that for the next attempt.

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